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Author: Hogan Lovells International LLP

European Commission and Article 29 Working Party Urge Respect for International Law in Data Cases

Territoriality will continue to be one of the most vexing problems for data regulation in 2018.  One aspect of this debate relates to whether a U.S. judge can compel the disclosure of personal data located in Europe without using international treaty mechanisms.  This issue is currently being considered by the United States Supreme Court in the case United States v. Microsoft.  The case involves the question of whether a U.S. statute relating to search warrants can be interpreted as extending to a search for data located outside the United States; in this case, the data is located in Ireland. ...

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Misunderstandings, Panic and Priorities in the Year of the GDPR

It is finally here. This is the year of the GDPR. A journey that started with an ambitious policy paper about modernising data protection almost a decade ago – a decade! – is about to reach flying altitude. No more ‘in May next year this, in May next year that’. Our time has come. Given the amount of attention that the GDPR has received in recent times, data protection professionals are in high demand but we are ready. We knew this was coming and we have had years to prepare. However, even the most seasoned practitioners are at risk...

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Privacy and Cybersecurity Upcoming 2018 Events

Please join us for our Upcoming 2018 Privacy and Cybersecurity Events. February 1 Challenges for GDPR Implementation Mark Brennan will moderate a panel on GDPR issues at the FCBA CLE: International Privacy: U.S. Perspectives on EU Privacy Frameworks. Location: Washington, D.C.   February 21 Privacy, What Does That Look Like? Joke Bodewits will participate in a speaking engagement on accountability at the Institute for International Research on GDPR countdown congress. Location: Amsterdam   February 27 GDPR Challenges for Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Eduardo Ustaran will speak on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and the GDPR at the International Privacy+Security Forum. Location: Washington, D.C.  ...

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Thinking Strategically About Brexit and Data Protection

To date, the main legacy of the Brexit referendum of 2016 appears to be a country split in half: some badly wish the UK would continue to be a member of the EU and some are equally keen on making a move. Yet, there seems to be at least one thing on which Remainers and Leavers will agree: nobody knows exactly what is going to happen. The same is true of the effect of Brexit on UK data protection. However, as Brexit day approaches, it is becoming imperative for those with responsibility for data protection compliance to make some...

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Navigating the Road Ahead: Auto Industry Stakeholders and Regulators Convene to Discuss Connected Vehicle Privacy

In the same week that the automotive industry gathers in Washington, D.C. for the 2018 Washington Auto Show, a cross-section of automotive stakeholders, government officials, and consumer and privacy advocates came together at Hogan Lovells’ Washington office to discuss privacy issues facing connected vehicles. The half-day conference, co-hosted by Hogan Lovells and the Future of Privacy Forum, convened on January 23, with the theme of “Privacy and the Connected Vehicle: Navigating the Road Ahead.” Panels focused on the privacy landscape surrounding automobiles and connectivity generally, regulatory developments and areas of government interest, and the effect of emerging technologies on business models...

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FCC Privacy Rules Break New Ground

The Federal Communication Commission’s (FCC) long-awaited – and much debated – privacy rules for Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have now been adopted.  The agency approved the rules by a 3-2 vote along political party lines last Thursday. Several of the FCC requirements are particularly notable for being more restrictive than the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) standards for consumer online privacy.  In this post we provide an overview of some of the new FCC rules and highlight key areas where the FCC’s requirements diverge from the FTC’s framework. Requirements for ISPs Although the full text of the FCC’s decision has not yet been released, an agency fact sheet provides details on some of the key requirements: Transparency.  The rules require that ISPs, whether they offer mobile broadband or fixed broadband services, to: (1) notify customers about what types of information the ISP collects about customers; (2) specify how and for what purposes the ISP uses and shares this information; and (3) identify the types of entities with which the ISP shares this information. Consumer Choice.  ISPs must obtain opt-in consent to use and share “sensitive information” such as precise geolocation information, web browsing history, app usage history, the content of communications, and health information.  ISPs must also provide consumers an ability to opt out of the use and sharing of non-sensitive information.  Certain exceptions to these consent standards are provided,...

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Congress Looking at Potential Energy-Sector Cybersecurity and Privacy Reform

Energy-sector cybersecurity and privacy is generating significant attention of late. Last month, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued a final rule creating new standards for the cybersecurity of the electric grid. FERC followed this issuance with a report on electrical grid recovery and restoration planning that makes a number of recommendations for improved cyber-incident response and recovery plans. In parallel, the U.S. Congress is working on a variety of measures to combat perceived cybersecurity and privacy threats related to the powergrid. The failure of the powergrid in Ukraine due to security breaches; reports of ISIS and other foreign threats...

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